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All Saints' Church, Winterton

featured image from the article: All Saints’ Church, Winterton

all saints church chancel

Winterton and All Saints’ Church

There is much of interest in All Saints and within our community of Winterton. The town still shows much of its medieval origins and has several handsome Georgian stone houses. All Saints, very large for a rural church, dates from before 1100 and has many interesting features as well as hosting Winterton’s heritage centre.

All Saints is located at the heart of Winterton’s Conservation Area of which it is an integral part. The buildings in this conservation area span several centuries, but they are united by a predominant use of local limestone, brick and tiles.

All Saints’ Church

In the Conservation Area Appraisal completed by North Lincolnshire Council it states “The most important listed building [in Winterton] is the Church of All Saints…. It is listed Grade I.” [Winterton Conservation Area Appraisal – March 2002]. The tower, and high nave roof, can be seen from afar on the approach roads to Winterton and from footpaths across the shallow valley to the south. The central location of the church on the south facing slope above the market place provides a beautiful backdrop to the town centre. Artists have often painted this view. It is likely that the churchyard is older than any part of the current church building since it is possible, though there is no firm evidence, that an Anglo-Saxon church occupied the site before the present stone building. The church is located close to the site of the former Weir Pond which occupied the centre of Market Street or Weir Hill as it was once known . This large spring-fed pond was filled in and covered over in the 1860s but is likely to have been the site of baptisms in early Christian times. All Saints is large for a rural church and was this size by 1245. The tower was erected about 1080/1090
against an even older stone building. Much of this early medieval fabric remains and has been repaired and re-ordered in the recent £1.8m project which includes a hospitality extension [toilets and commercial kitchen]. It remains an active church which is now also a superb heritage centre and community event venue.

There is so much to see in All Saint’s Church: displays, information, stained glass,  glorious architecture and a Heritage Centre.

all saints church internal photo

Opening hours:
From 2-4pm every Saturday and on some Wednesdays we are open especially for visitors. Welcome staff are on hand to answer any questions. The church is also open regularly for church services and community activities [see our website for our events programme]

Parking:
Please note that Churchside is a narrow, one-way street and parking is not possible. Street parking is usually possible on West Street [north of the church].

Toilets:
There are toilets at the church, including disabled, infant and baby change. Public conveniences are located at the lower end of Queen Street.

Accessibility issues:
All Saints is a medieval building but wheelchair access is possible via the South Porch which faces Churchside. While the ground floor of the tower is at a lower level than the rest of the church, all other ground floor areas are fully accessible. The churchyard gate in the south east corner at the Churchside/Queen Street junction has no step or ramp.

Location: Ordnance survey Grid Ref. SE 928186
The nearest bus stop to our church is in High Street. There is the 350 service [Scunthorpe-Hull] as well as
the 55 [Scunthorpe, Appleby, Winterton].

Visiting Winterton
The best way to see Winterton is to use the free Walk Around Winterton leaflet available at the church. It will lead you round the historic core of the town, allow you to see a range of interesting buildings and learn about the local heritage.

all saints church heritage centre

Winterton

featured image from the article: All Saints’ Church, Winterton

all saints church internal photo

Winterton and All Saints’ Church

There is much of interest in All Saints and within our community of Winterton. The town still shows much of its medieval origins and has several handsome Georgian stone houses. All Saints, very large for a rural church, dates from before 1100 and has many interesting features as well as hosting Winterton’s heritage centre.

The town of Winterton
Winterton is a small town [population almost 5,000] close to the Humber Estuary. It sits on the upper part of the Lincoln Edge limestone dip slope, facing east, and the parish slopes gently down to the River Ancholme. To the east of the town Ermine Street runs north from Lincoln towards the former Humber crossing point at Winteringham. Along the western edge of the town, Old Street, the pre-Roman ridge top way, runs from Lincoln also towards Winteringham. A number of important Roman remains exist locally including Winterton Roman Villa. Although not historically attested, it is possible that, around 485, Winta, the first of the Lindisware to rule, started his Anglo-Saxon kingdom based on Winterton and neighbouring Winteringham. The kingdom developed to become Lindsey. The name Winta means ‘white’, probably in the sense of blond hair, which would be a notable feature of the Angles in relation to the darker native Britons.
The present settlement is certainly of Anglo-Saxon origin and listed in the Domesday Survey. The layout is medieval with long narrow plots running north/south on either side of High Street, Low Street, King Street and Park Street. In the late 18th and 19th centuries, Winterton expanded dramatically as a result of the prosperity brought about by agricultural improvements. This made it a market town of regional significance. However, it was eclipsed by the even more dramatic rise of Scunthorpe in the late 19th
century. The loose-knit town, with a distinct emphasis on east-west streets, has been infilled by successive phases of development which continued throughout the 20th century. It is now largely a dormitory settlement but it maintains a range of shops and services and has nurseries and infant, junior and secondary comprehensive schools which serve many surrounding villages. All Saints is located at the heart of Winterton’s Conservation Area of which it is an integral part. The buildings in this conservation area span several centuries, but they are united by a predominant use of local limestone, brick and tiles. The informal streets are defined by properties, which generally front
directly onto them. The earlier houses date from the 17th century but most of the historic buildings are late Georgian town houses.

All Saints’ Church
North Lincolnshire Council state that “The most important listed building [in Winterton] is the Church of All Saints…. It is listed Grade I.” [Winterton Conservation Area Appraisal – March 2002]. The tower, and high nave roof, can be seen from afar on the approach roads to Winterton and from footpaths across the shallow valley to the south. The central location of the church on the south facing slope above the market place provides a beautiful backdrop to the town centre. Artists have often painted this view. It is likely that the churchyard is older than any part of the current church building since it is possible, though there is no firm evidence, that an Anglo-Saxon church occupied the site before the present stone building. The church is located close to the site of the former Weir Pond which occupied the centre of Market Street or Weir Hill as it was once known . This large spring-fed pond was filled in and covered over in the 1860s but is likely to have been the site of baptisms in early Christian times. All Saints is large for a rural church and was this size by 1245. The tower was erected about 1080/1090
against an even older stone building. Much of this early medieval fabric remains and has been repaired and re-ordered in the recent £1.8m project which includes a hospitality extension [toilets and commercial kitchen]. It remains an active church which is now also a superb heritage centre and community event venue.
ourchurchweb.org.uk/winterton/

Opening hours:
From 2-4pm every Saturday and on some Wednesdays we are open especially for visitors. Welcome staff are on hand to answer any questions. The church is also open regularly for church services and community activities [see our website for our events programme]

Parking:
Please note that Churchside is a narrow, one-way street and parking is not possible. Street parking is usually possible on West Street [north of the church].

winterton sculpture

Winterton 2022 unveiled a statue of the late Wallace Sargent – a world-famous astronomer who grew up in North Lincolnshire. The partnership commissioned local artist and sculptor Michael Scrimshaw who is based at The Ropewalk, Barton upon Humber to create the statue. Which now sits outside Winterton Junior School to help inspire a new generation of scientists. The statue can be visited during your time in Winterton.

Visiting Winterton
The best way to see Winterton is to use the free Walk Around Winterton leaflet available at the church. It will lead you round the historic core of the town, allow you to see a range of interesting buildings and learn about the local heritage. A number of maps, walks & Trails can be found here: Leaflets & Brochures – Visit North Lincolnshire

The nearest bus stop to our church is in High Street. There is the 350 service [Scunthorpe-Hull] as well as
the 55 [Scunthorpe, Appleby, Winterton].

Winterton sign image

 

Four Seasons Coffee Shop - Silica Lodge Garden Centre

featured image from the article: Winterton

Four Seasons Coffee Shop, Located within Silica Lodge Garden Centre, you’re sure to find a warm welcome awaits you. Eat in our indoor seating area or for when the weather is warmer, we have an outside patio area where you can sit and admire the birds and squirrels that feed on our giant bird table.

The dog separate friendly area is also open 7 days a week.

We serve homemade meals, cakes and sweet treats to accompany your refreshments, which you can eat in or takeaway and we also have a daily specials board.
Four Seasons Coffee Shop – Direct2Gardens

Coffee Shop Opening Times-
Monday – Saturday 9:00am – 4:00pm (Last orders 3:30pm)
Sunday 10:00am – 4:00pm (Last orders 3:30pm)

four seasons coffee

Lindsey Lodge - Meet and Eat Restaurant

featured image from the article: Four Seasons Coffee Shop – Silica Lodge Garden Centre

Nestled at the heart of Lindsey Lodge our Meet and Eat Restaurant is our worst kept secret. Open to the public 8am – 4pm on Mondays and 11am – 12pm on a Sunday our restaurant serves a fantastic range of light bites and home cooked meals daily.

Our cakes and desserts are baked by our chefs and team of expert volunteers, who produce some truly fabulous creations that will have you ordering some to eat and take away. Coffee and Cake special for just £5.25!

Our restaurant can get very busy around lunch time so we would recommend calling to pre-book your table to ensure you get seated. Check our socials on a Monday morning to see our specials for the week, and visit our website to download our full menu. Lindsey Lodge Hospice – Dine with us

lindsey lodge cheesecake

lindsey lodge coffee

Every penny of the profits goes to fund the patient meals on our inpatient unit, so you know you are doing something amazing with every bite.

Moon Coffee & Kitchen

featured image from the article: Lindsey Lodge – Meet and Eat Restaurant

Moon Coffee & Kitchen is an independently run cosy coffee shop which serves a wide range of delicious hot and cold food as well as drinks, cakes & snacks. We are fully plant based & offer an array of wholesome food, such as Biscoff pancake stacks, avocado on toast, houmous & falafel flatbread, super food salads & warming soups. We hold regular events such as yoga mornings, craft workshops & acoustic music sessions, full details can be found on our Facebook page. As well as all of our delicious coffee options, we serve a wide range of loose-leaf teas & speciality lattes too – including Matcha, Beetroot and Turmeric Lattes.

Opening Times –
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday 10am – 4pm
Thursday 10am – 8pm

dogs are welcome to join us outside, dog water bowl available.

biscoff pancakes moon coffee

moon coffee cake

Cleatham Hall - Orangery Restaurant

featured image from the article: Moon Coffee & Kitchen

Cleatham Hall’s Orangery Restaurant is open Wednesday-Sunday, offering lunch, afternoon tea, dinner and Sunday lunch. Our menus are created seasonally and use only the finest, locally-sourced ingredients.

We are incredibly flexible and can cater for all allergies and dietary requirements.

Lunch & Afternoon Tea – Wednesday-Saturday 12-4pm
Dinner – Wednesday-Saturday 6.30-8.30pm
Sunday Lunch 12-4pm

meal at cleathan hall

pasta meal and bread at cleatham
Afternoon tea at Cleathan Hall
Cleatham Hall

Papist Hall Cottages

featured image from the article: Cleatham Hall – Orangery Restaurant

Papist Hall Cottages, Barrow Upon Humber

Charming, thoughtfully renovated cottages within the 17th century Papist Hall, built in the late 1600’s and one of the oldest buildings in the village of Barrow upon Humber. A relaxed, rural base for touring Lincolnshire, Yorkshire and Humber.

Abbots Retreat- 
Living room, dining room with Log Burner, plus fully equipped kitchen. 3 bedrooms (2 doubles, 1 single) and 2 Bathrooms, 1 with bath and 1 with shower.

Priests Abode-
Living room, dining room with wood burner and fully equipped kitchen. 2 bedrooms (1 double, 1 bunk beds), Shower room on ground floor with shower cubicle, toilet and heated towel rail.

The newly renovated cottages offer a delightful mix of period features and modern amenities finished to a high standard. The enclosed gardens feature numerous relaxing seating areas, impressive stonework arches and planters, BBQ and a delightful range of planting featuring mature trees and vibrant flowers. A welcome pack featuring quality local produce is ready waiting for visitors to sample.

The small village of Barrow upon Humber has range of shops and amenities as well as pubs serving food all within walking distance. Barrow upon Humber’s most famous son is John Harrison, inventor of the marine chronometer which allowed sailors to calculate longitude at sea, greatly improving safety at sea and saving many lives.

These properties can be booked together to accommodate up to 16 guests.

papist hall advert

The White Hart, Brigg

featured image from the article: Papist Hall Cottages

Exclusive hire of your own pub with 17 bedrooms sleeping 10-40 people. A unique luxury waterfront celebration venue. The Brigg White Hart has been restored and converted into an exclusive self-catering venue for you to hire. Perfect for celebrations, DIY weddings and impressive corporate stays and events.

Hire your very own riverside pub and hotel!
Think of a large farmhouse but instead of a living room you have your own bar…… oh and it has a snug, attached cottage rooms, function area, large kitchen, riverside beer garden and of course the 15 + 2 bedrooms with enough beds to sleep 40.

You will have exclusive use of the whole venue.

Established in 1759 and sitting on the banks of the Old River Ancholme, farmers and traders used to leave their horses and carts in the White Hart pub stables that backed onto Sergeants Brewery. Grand houses ran on both sides, the reading room, Springs factory all now long gone….The White Hart has stood the test of time. In 1978 Ray Neall purchased the pub when it was in a state of disrepair. This was the last time it was renovated, until now!

We have retained the original bar area, increased the large function space, added a high-end kitchen, intimate snugs, games area, landscaped the riverside beer garden and added 15 bedrooms with a further 2 cottage bedroom snugs.

We can be anything you need…. from unforgettable family parties, birthdays and anniversaries to spectacular DIY weddings and seriously impressive corporate events and meetings. Perfect for large groups with a flexible space to hold events throughout the year.

This self-catering venue is attractive to people from all over the country with the capacity alone. Why hire a farmhouse when you can hire your own pub!

Holiday in your very own pub | The White Hart (briggwhitehart.co.uk)

white hart bedroom
The white hart Brigg exterior
The white hart brigg, pub
the white hart brigg dining area

Scunthorpe Bowl

featured image from the article: The White Hart, Brigg

Welcome to Scunthorpe Bowl, we are a 20 lane centre that provides bar and restaurant facilities with a excellent menu on offer. DJ Party Night every Friday and Saturday from 6PM til Late.

scunthorpe bowling alley lanes

Plus digital darts, ludus wall, Pool Golf, TapGlo, Shuffleboard, Mini Golf and Axe throwing for the adults! – a one-stop entertainment hub.

Other leisure activities include: Pool Tables, Arcade machines, Air Hockey and lots more.

scunthorpe bowl barscunthorpe bowl entrancescunthorpe bowl golf

Check out the special offers and parties available via the website bookings page or Facebook: Scunthorpe Bowl Facebook

La Finca

featured image from the article: Scunthorpe Bowl

La Finca is a well established tapas restaurant that has built up an excellent reputation across North Lincolnshire.

The spirit of rural Spain is captured here in our glass courtyard atrium, surrounded by palms, chandeliers and huge basket lighting transforms your evening into the holiday restaurant we all miss.

A separate la Finca bar can also be booked for large private dining with the caricature backdrop is an amusing addition to the evening.

Eat, drink and relax the holiday vibe at the La Finca restaurant. Browse the menu here: Menus | La Finca

Open only on Friday & Saturday evenings we offer a fixed course menu which changes on a regular basis (see menus), various tapas is served during the night creating a amazing social event, with your table for the evening sit and relax in this unique environment in the lovely market town of Brigg Lincolnshire.

Special paella events are popular with large paella pan burners cooked in front of you on the occasional promotional evenings.

Tables can be booked online here: Book Now | La Finca

spanish food in traditional terracotta dishescold food platter on serving board